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Old 03-28-2014, 10:26 PM   #1
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Foster family?

I would like to help even more at shelters than I am now ( I advertise animals that need homes) and I think I might be interested in fostering dogs. I haven't talked to any shelters about fostering and have not completely decided that fostering would be a good idea. I just want some help making my decision, Ex: what questions do I need to ask myself. And what is the hardest part (besides letting them leave your home) thanks in advance for all responses.


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Old 03-29-2014, 06:11 PM   #2
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I have pretty limited experience with fostering. I have fostered three times, my first was a failed foster she ended up as part of our family indefinitely. The other two were definitely difficult to say goodbye to, and for me I really had a difficult time with that.

Depending on the dog and where it's come from, what it's needs are etc, it can sometimes be chaotic. And depending on the rescue and where the dog is at, some training might be involved to make the dog adoptable.

I think what I would consider if this is something you're really interested in is first, how do other members of your family feel about it and are they on board with it?

Do you have somewhere to keep the dog separate from your own dogs? Dynamics can sometimes change bringing a new dog in, and they can shift again when the new dog becomes more comfortable in a new environment.

Foster dogs might have medical issues which are different than our own pets and are you prepared to take on that role in monitoring and care-taking.

You're also going to likely take on an animal which might have a lack of training/manners or possible anxiety regarding separation or crating. Those are real possibilities and there is the possibility of the dog causing damage as well in those or other scenarios.

It certainly can be amazingly rewarding, but for me it was a bit hard to let go. My situation now would not be conducive to fostering as I don't have as much time as I once did, and... my husband would soooo not be on board

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Old 03-30-2014, 10:44 PM   #3
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My mom thinks fostering would be great for me because I would give anything to see an orphaned animal go to a new home, I'm willing to put myself through having to say goodbye. I have a separate crate to keep foster dogs away from my dogs if needed. I'm going to e-mail the nearest shelters to see what they say about fostering. I know the one in town will be ecstatic because they can only keep a dog for two weeks so they put a lot to sleep . Thanks for your help, will let you know what happens.


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Old 08-10-2014, 10:13 AM   #4
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Fostering is a firm commitment. Once you start, you need to see it through.

As the previous poster mentioned, depending on the dog, where it came from, and what its needs are, it can sometimes be chaotic. And depending on the rescue and where the dog is at, some training might be involved to make the dog adoptable.

Since the dog is considered property of the shelter or rescue, they generally help cover the expenses, especially where vet care is concerned.

Fostering a dog may seem like a formidable task, but it's a very tangible way to make a difference. Everyone benefits: The foster volunteer gets to spend time with a special dog, and the kennel gains space for a new dog. The foster dog gets a break from kennel life and a second chance at becoming a cherished pet. The new owners get a dog that is better adapted to home life, and therefore has a better chance of remaining in the new home permanently.

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